Space Research

Planck for the Nordic Countries

Trough the system for Principal Investigator teams Nordic institutes will play an important role in using the Planck data for further research around the birth of the and the evolution to this day. Without disparagement for the other countries, Denmark has played a major role in the development, and will possibly make the most use of the incoming data.

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First Light for Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

On August 26 2008, first light results of the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST,[1]) were announced jointly by NASA and the US department of
energy . At the same time GLAST changed its name to Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope.

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Large Hadron Collider Activated

10 September 2008 had long been anticipated by particle physicists at CERN and across the globe. The suspense and excitement
was tangible as physicists gathered in the control room to follow
the protons on their maiden voyage around the 27 km accelerator
ring complex.

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The Hunt for Supersymmetry

Supersymmetry (SUSY) is one of the most promising and most studied extensions to the so-called Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. It elegantly solves several theoretical problems of the model: How is the mass of the Higgs particle kept finite? Can the forces of Nature be unified a manifestations of one governing principle? SUSY also provides a candidate for the so-called “Dark Matter” that seems to be prevalent in the Universe. Next year, when the physics programme of the Large Hadron Collider starts up we will have the best possibility so far to detect if SUSY is part of Nature.

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Finding the Secret Code of Nature

At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the high energy particle physics facility CERN near Geneva, in Switzerland, thousands of physicists from all over the world have built the next instrument that is going to help them decode the secrets of Nature: the ATLAS detector

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Technology Transfer from CERN

In the quest to find out what matter is made of and how its different components interact, high-energy physics needs very sophisticated instruments using technologies and requiring performance that often exceed what is available to industry. New technologies are developed to solve specific needs at CERN, but these technologies are often applicable outside the physics laboratories. The most well known technology coming from CERN is the World Wide Web (WWW), originally developed to solve the information sharing need between physicists and laboratories. This technology was made freely available to everyone and is today part of the everyday modern communication.

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